Detailed outline

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outlining a concept analysis 

Submit a thorough outline for your Concept Analysis paper (Emotional Intelligence) in current APA format.

An APA outline is more in-depth than a typical numbered outline;

be sure to research an outline of this nature.

Quotes, resources, and definitions with citations should be included.

Running head: CHRONIC PAIN CONCEPT ANALYSIS OUTLINE

2

Chronic Pain Concept Analysis (Example)

[Course number here]

Chronic Pain Concept Analysis Outline

1. Introduction

a. Purpose of the paper—To explore chronic pain in order to get a better understanding of its treatments, education, and overall condition.

b. Explanation of concept analysis

i. Definition—Explores the meaning of concepts to promote understanding (McEwen & Wills, 2014).

c. Why this concept was chosen

i. Chronic pain is a topic that I am familiar with in my everyday life. I currently deal with chronic pain in my knee that is related to a childhood injury.

d. How chronic pain is applied to nursing research and nursing education

2. Review of Literature

a. Definition of chronic pain—Dictionary.com

i. Chronic: Adjective—1. constant; habitual; inveterate; 2. continuing a long time or recurring frequently; 3. having long had a disease, habit, weakness, or the like: chronic invalid; 4. (of a disease) having long duration (opposed to acute). (Dictionary.com, n.d.).

ii. Pain: Noun—1. physical suffering or distress, as due to injury, illness, etc.; 2. a distressing sensation in a particular part of the body; 3. mental or emotional suffering or torment. Verb—1. to cause physical pain to; hurt.; 2. to cause (someone) mental or emotional pain; distress; 3. to have or give pain. (Dictionary.com, n.d.)

b. Chronic pain nursing articles

i. Craner, J., Sperry, J., Koball, A., Morrison, E., & Gilliam, W. (2017).
Unique contributions of acceptance and catastrophizing on chronic pain adaptation
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
24(4), 542–551.

ii. Mamhidir, A.-G., Sjölund, B.-M., Fläckman, B., Wimo, A., Sköldunger, A., & Engström, M. (2017). Systematic pain assessment in nursing homes: A cluster-randomized trial using mixed-methods approach. 
BMC Geriatrics
17, 1–16.
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0454-z

iii. Wilson, I. R. (2017). Management of chronic pain through pain management programmes. 
British Medical Bulletin
124(1), 55–64.
https://doi.org/10.1093/bmb/ldx032

c. Chronic pain psychology articles

i. Molton, I. R., & Terrill, A. L. (2014). Overview of persistent pain in older adults. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 197–207.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035794

ii. McCracken, L. M., & Vowles, K. E. (2014). Acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness for chronic pain: Model, process, and progress. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 178–187.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035623

iii. Flor, H. (2014). Psychological pain interventions and neurophysiology: Implications for a mechanism-based approach. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 188–196.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035254

d. Chronic pain education articles

i. Louw, A., Zimney, K., & Puentedura, E. (2016). Retention of pain neuroscience knowledge: A multi-centre trial. 
New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy
44(2), 91–96.
https://doi.org/10.15619/NZJP/44.2.04

ii.
Puentedura, E. J., & Flynn, T. (2016). Combining manual therapy with pain neuroscience education in the treatment of chronic low back pain: A narrative review of the literature. 
Physiotherapy Theory & Practice
32(5), 408–414.
https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2016.1194663

iii. Louw, A., Puentedura, E. “Louie” J., & Zimney, K. (2016). Teaching patients about pain: It works, but what should we call it? 
Physiotherapy Theory & Practice
32(5), 328–331.
https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2016.1194669

e. Synthesis of all articles

3. Defining Attributes

a. Pain

b. Suffering

c. Discomfort

d. Duration of pain

4. Definition of Concept

a. Narrative incorporating all defining attributes

5. Cases

a. Model Case

i. Model Case definition

ii. Model Case example

iii. Why the Model Case meets criteria

b. Borderline Case

i. Borderline Case definition

ii. Borderline Case example

iii. Why the Borderline Case meets criteria

c. Related Case

i. Related Case definition

ii. Related Case example

iii. Why the Related Case meets criteria

d. Contrary Case

i. Contrary Case definition

ii. Contrary Case example

iii. Why the Contrary Case meets criteria

e. Illegitimate case

i. Illegitimate Case definition

ii. Illegitimate Case example

iii. Why the Illegitimate Case meets criteria

f. Invented Case

i. Invented Case definition

ii. Invented Case example

iii. Why the Inverted Case meets criteria

6. Antecedents and Consequences

a. Antecedents of chronic pain

b. Consequences of chronic pain

7. Empirical Referents

a. How the concept is measured

i. Definition of concept used by researcher

ii. Purpose and structure of the measurement tool

b.
Study where the tool was used—Aziato, L., Dedey, F., Marfo, K., Avoka Asamani, J., & Clegg-Lamptey, J. N. A. (2015). Validation of three pain scales among adult postoperative patients in Ghana. 
BMC Nursing
14(1), 1–9.
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-015-0094-6

i. Purpose

ii. Sample

iii. Method

iv. Main findings

8. Summary

a. Add summary here

References

Aziato, L., Dedey, F., Marfo, K., Avoka Asamani, J., & Clegg-Lamptey, J. N. A. (2015). Validation of three pain scales among adult postoperative patients in Ghana. 
BMC Nursing
14(1), 1–9.
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-015-0094-6

Craner, J., Sperry, J., Koball, A., Morrison, E., & Gilliam, W. (2017).
Unique contributions of acceptance and catastrophizing on chronic pain adaptation
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
24(4), 542–551.

Dictionary.com. (n.d.). Retrieved July 19, 2019, from  https://www.dictionary.com/

Flor, H. (2014). Psychological pain interventions and neurophysiology: Implications for a mechanism-based approach. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 188–196.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035254

Louw, A., Puentedura, E. “Louie” J., & Zimney, K. (2016). Teaching patients about pain: It works, but what should we call it? 
Physiotherapy Theory & Practice
32(5), 328–331.
https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2016.1194669

Louw, A., Zimney, K., & Puentedura, E. (2016). Retention of pain neuroscience knowledge: A multi-centre trial. 
New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy
44(2), 91–96.
https://doi.org/10.15619/NZJP/44.2.04

Mamhidir, A.-G., Sjölund, B.-M., Fläckman, B., Wimo, A., Sköldunger, A., & Engström, M. (2017). Systematic pain assessment in nursing homes: A cluster-randomized trial using mixed-methods approach. 
BMC Geriatrics
17, 1–16.
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0454-z

McCracken, L. M., & Vowles, K. E. (2014). Acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness for chronic pain: Model, process, and progress. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 178–187.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035623

McEwen, M., & Wills, E. (2014).
Theoretical basis for nursing (4th ed.). Wolter Kluwer.

Molton, I. R., & Terrill, A. L. (2014). Overview of persistent pain in older adults. 
American Psychologist
69(2), 197–207.
https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035794

Puentedura, E. J., & Flynn, T. (2016). Combining manual therapy with pain neuroscience education in the treatment of chronic low back pain: A narrative review of the literature. 
Physiotherapy Theory & Practice
32(5), 408–414.
https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2016.1194663

Wilson, I. R. (2017). Management of chronic pain through pain management programmes. 
British Medical Bulletin
124(1), 55–64.
https://doi.org/10.1093/bmb/ldx032

Concept Analysis Paper Assignment Instructions

Purpose and Process

The concepts are related to nursing practice, education, and/or administration. For example, if you are planning to be a family nurse practitioner, you might choose the concept of family support. In this assignment, you will review the literature related to the study of your concept from different disciplines. Doing so will help illuminate the meaning of the concept.

Paper Guidelines

1. Introduction (5 points): This section informs the reader of the purpose and focus of your paper. In addition, this section also explains what a concept analysis is, according to the literature. Then, describe why you chose your concept and its application to nursing research and another area in nursing, such as nursing administration, nursing practice, or nursing education.

2. Review of the Literature (15 points): This is the main section of your paper which identifies all uses of the concept. First, begin with the dictionary and lay sources, then move to academic literature. Review the nursing literature related your topic, as well as two other disciplines, such as biology, psychology, or law. The selected literature should mainly be scholarly, peer reviewed journal articles and textbooks. Provide a brief summary of each of these articles and connect them together as a synthesis. For example, for postpartum depression, you would review the literature in nursing, and two other possible disciplines such as psychology and social work. Generally, use references published within the last five years, unless there is a landmark piece of literature (for example, Peplau’s theory of interpersonal relationships). Use at least three scholarly articles from each discipline. Write a synthesis of these articles (for example, compare and contrast focus and/or findings). For more information, examine
Nursing: How to Write a Literature Review.

3. Defining attributes (15 points): From your literature review of uses of the concept (sources such as the dictionary and the thesaurus [lay sources] and academic articles), determine the defining attributes of your concept. In order to accomplish this, make sure to do the following for each of your selected sources (academic articles, dictionaries, textbooks):(1) read them entirely, (2) highlight or underline the definitions in each source to keep track of the various definitions used to define your concept, and (3) extract the definitions from all sources for a comprehensive list of attributes that define your specific concept. Two or three defining attributes may exist for one concept, whereas for another concept, there could be seven or eight defining attributes. Do a comprehensive review of the literature within your selected sources prior to deciding on the final list of defining attributes, to capture the essence or meaning of your concept.

4. Definition of the Concept (5 points): Write a definition that incorporates all the concept’s defining attributes in one-to-two paragraphs.

5. Cases (35 points): Ensure your cases fit your designated case types. Also, be sure to provide a rationale for why your case meets that criterion. In the example of a model case, first describe what a model case is according to the literature, then describe your model case and why it meets that criterion. Be specific. You should follow this method with each of your cases.

a. Model Case: (15 points)

b. Borderline, Related, Contrary, Illegitimate, and Invented Cases. (Each section is worth 4 points; 20 points for this component.)

6. Antecedents and Consequences (Each section is worth 5 points; 10 points for this component.): Antecedents are the events/required elements that occur before the concept can happen. Consequences are the events/outcomes that take place after the concept occurs. Antecedents and consequences cannot be the same. They also cannot be the concept itself, but the events/required elements that take place before or after the concept is evident.

7. Empirical Referents (5 points): Describe how the concept is measured by two research tools. Define the concept that the researcher used and the purpose and structure of the tool (that is, number of items), and then note one study where the tool was used and include its purpose, sample, method, and main findings. This information can come from your literature review.

8. Summary (5 points): Summarize your paper and do not provide new information. You should not leave the reader in suspense, as if there would be a sequel.

9. Format (5 points): Your paper should use APA formatting for its all components and formal writing mechanics, and be free of spelling and grammar errors.

Other Requirements

· Your paper should be 10 to 12 pages long, typed in a Times New Roman 12-point font, and have 1-inch margins. The paper’s length does not include the title page and references list. Do not include appendices.

· You will have following three milestones for your concept analysis paper so that your instructor can provide you with feedback on its development:

1. Concept analysis outline: It includes the Introduction through Review of the Literature with at least four references styled in APA format. This outline is due in Week 3. (Counts as 10% of the concept analysis paper’s grade.)

2. Concept analysis draft: A draft of the entire paper is due in Week 5. The concept analysis draft you submit in Week 5 should be a complete version of the paper. Each part of the final paper should be present, including references styled in proper APA format. The closer that your draft is to the final paper, the more specific feedback your NU601 faculty can provide to you to help improve your final submission (submitted in Week 7). (This draft is worth 10% of the concept analysis paper grade.)

3. Final paper: The final complete paper is due in Week 7 (The final paper is worth 80% of the concept analysis paper grade)

Helpful Hints

· Ensure you review the Week 2 and Week 3 learning materials and readings on concept analysis before you begin writing your concept analysis paper. Refer to the examples in the media activities about what should be included in a concept analysis.

· Use the paper guideline headings to organize your paper. Subheadings might also be helpful, but use them judiciously.

· Reference all work that is not your own or common knowledge, such as “alcoholism is a serious problem.”

· For each section of your paper, define what each part means according to the literature, then provide your explanation. You will want to define what a concept analysis is, as well as the meaning of defining attributes, model cases, borderline cases, etc.

· You may combine your review of the literature pertaining to the three disciplines or present each separately.

· Do not use broad assumptions without data or evidence to support them.

· Write in your own words.

· Do not use colloquial statements or informal language, such as “Let’s take the car for a spin.”

· If you find a concept analysis of your concept, you may use it very judiciously. Your paper should be your own work.

· Review this example of a concept analysis paper: West, P., Abbott, P., & Probst, P. (2014).
Alarm fatigue: A concept analysis.
Online Journal of Nursing Informatics 18(2). It is not perfect, but it should help your understanding of how to write your paper.

· You may
not use basic nursing resources (such as
Registered Nurse Journal or
American Journal of Nursing), nor basic nursing textbooks. You may use websites that are classified as .org or .edu websites. However, such websites should be used judiciously.

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