Writing and rhetoric assignment (due 24 hours)

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 Parts 1 and 2  have the same questions. However, you must answer with references and different writing, always addressing them objectively, as if you were different students. Similar responses in wording or references will not be accepted. 

APA format

1) Minimum 6 pages  (No word count per page)-  Four paragraphs per page

You must strictly comply with the number of paragraphs requested per page.  

The number of words in each paragraph should be similar

         

         Part 1: minimum 3 pages

         Part 2: minimum 3 pages

Submit 1 document per part

2)¨******APA norms

        The number of words in each paragraph should be similar

        Must be written in the 3 person

         All paragraphs must be narrative and cited in the text- each paragraph

         The writing must be coherent, using connectors or conjunctive to extend, add information, or contrast information. 

         Bulleted responses are not accepted

         Don’t write in the first person 

         Do not use subtitles or titles      

         Don’t copy and paste the questions.

         Answer the question objectively, do not make introductions to your answers, answer it when you start the paragraph

Submit 1 document per part

3)****************************** It will be verified by Turnitin (Identify the percentage of exact match of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks) 

********************************It will be verified by SafeAssign (Identify the percentage of similarity of writing with any other resource on the internet and academic sources, including universities and data banks)

4) Minimum 3 references (APA format) per part not older than 5 years  (Journals, books) (No websites)

All references must be consistent with the topic-purpose-focus of the parts. Different references are not allowed 

5) Identify your answer with the numbers, according to the question. Start your answer on the same line, not the next

 Example:

Q 1. Nursing is XXXXX

Q 2. Health is XXXX

Q3. Research is…………………………………………………. (a) The relationship between……… (b) EBI has to

6) You must name the files according to the part you are answering: 

Example:

Part 1.doc 

Part 2.doc

__________________________________________________________________________________

Parts 1 and 2  have the same questions. However, you must answer with references and different writing, always addressing them objectively, as if you were different students. Similar responses in wording or references will not be accepted. 

The number of words in each paragraph should be similar

Part 1:  Writing and Rhetoric 

Four paragraphs per page. That is, must answer four questions per page

Reflect on the Stanford Study on Information Literacy” assignment (Check “Answers to Stanford Study file). 

1. Explain one question you got wrong on the original assignment (Check File 1)

*****If you got everything correct 

a. Describe one thing you hadn’t considered or one thing that you learned from reading the answers.  

2. How do you feel about your information literacy at this point? 

a. Are you surprised that you did as well as you did?  

b. Did you expect to do better?

3. Do you feel that this experience will help you to increase your information literacy moving forward? 

a. Why or why not? 

4. What do you think this study says about how easy it is to spot “good” and “bad” sources? 

5. Why might “good” sources be important, if we want to learn about what is happening in our society? 

Watch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWw1b7r_1eo

6. According to the video. What are the foundational questions of information literacy? 

7. Based on the video, what does research have to do with creativity? 

8. Based on the video, how is research collaborative? 

Pick any 2 ideas from the summary portion of the video (the portion after the “to sum up” slide)

9. Explain them in your own words. 

a. Why are these central ideas to information literacy? 

Think about the two activities together and what they demonstrate about your information literacy. 

10. Which of the components in the video do you feel you need the most practice with? 

a. Describe the component and why you don’t feel especially confident with this particular component.

11. What advice would you offer to other students that might want to improve their information literacy?  

12. How do these activities affect how you think about what constitutes research in the 21st C/digital age? 

Part 2:  Writing and Rhetoric 

Four paragraphs per page. That is, must answer four questions per page

Reflect on the Stanford Study on Information Literacy” assignment (Check “Answers to Stanford Study file). 

1. Explain one question you got wrong on the original assignment (Check File 2)

*****If you got everything correct 

a. Describe one thing you hadn’t considered or one thing that you learned from reading the answers.  

2. How do you feel about your information literacy at this point? 

a. Are you surprised that you did as well as you did?  

b. Did you expect to do better?

3. Do you feel that this experience will help you to increase your information literacy moving forward? 

a. Why or why not? 

4. What do you think this study says about how easy it is to spot “good” and “bad” sources? 

5. Why might “good” sources be important, if we want to learn about what is happening in our society? 

Watch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWw1b7r_1eo

6. According to the video. What are the foundational questions of information literacy? 

7. Based on the video, what does research have to do with creativity? 

8. Based on the video, how is research collaborative? 

Pick any 2 ideas from the summary portion of the video (the portion after the “to sum up” slide)

9. Explain them in your own words. 

a. Why are these central ideas to information literacy? 

Think about the two activities together and what they demonstrate about your information literacy. 

10. Which of the components in the video do you feel you need the most practice with? 

a. Describe the component and why you don’t feel especially confident with this particular component.

11. What advice would you offer to other students that might want to improve their information literacy?  

12. How do these activities affect how you think about what constitutes research in the 21st C/digital age? 

Answers to Stanford Study

The following are the answers to the Stanford Study, which asked students to answer the same questions you answered. It’s important to note that many students who were part of the study answered incorrectly, so do not feel bad if you answered incorrectly, too. 

1. Is the “We Know You’ve Got a Story” banner an article or an advertisement? How do you know? Explain your logic. 

Correct answer:  
This is an advertisement.  You can tell because they are asking for money.  It includes phrases like “Limited time only” and “save $20” and the promo code. 

2. Is the “Should California Stop Growing Almonds” block an article or an advertisement? How do you know?  Explain your logic. 

Correct answer:  
This is an article.  Here are some clues:  Nobody is asking for money.  The author is a person rather than an organization.  The article has a persuasive aim, and it’s hard to imagine the economic incentive for this argument.   

3. Is the “Real Reasons Women Don’t Go Into Tech” block an article or an advertisement? How do you know? Explain your logic.

Correct answer:  
This is an advertisement.  You can tell because of the term “sponsored content.”  According to dictionary.com, sponsored content can be defined as: “material in an online publication which resembles the publication’s editorial content but is paid for by an advertiser and intended to promote the advertiser’s product.”

Please note that an advertisement can look 100% like an article.  It can be long, can contain information, can be written by an author, can have a title, etc.  It is an advertisement simply because it is designed to sell something.  Here are some other identifying features:  Typically, individuals or organizations that are trying to sell their product, purchase the space (whether visual, textual, aural or otherwise) from the magazine or program where the ad appears.  Additionally, these adds are often created by advertising departments or organizations but can be made to look like they are created by everyday individuals. 

4. Examine the picture above. Does this post provide strong evidence about the conditions near the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant? Explain your reasoning.

Correct answer: 
 No. Nowhere does it say that this picture is taken near Fukishima. We also don’t know when it was taken. We don’t know anything about the person sharing the photo.

Also, while on one hand it might be true that radiated flowers look like this as the caption claims, the source is not claiming that these flowers are examples of what happened in Fukishima. This is a way for a source to be honest and misleading at the same time.  This is a common online trick that often works on those that haven’t learned to look for it.

On the other hand, it’s possible that these strange daisies are a naturally occurring variety of daisies — maybe these daisies look like this everywhere they grow on earth! The picture is asking you to make an assumption that something is wrong with the daisies.   

 Many of you missed this one but will be savvier in the future :). 

5. Why might this tweet be a useful source for your research? Why might it not be useful? Explain your reasoning.

It’s an okay source of data. It’s from a nationally recognized polling organization, and the tweet has a link to the study, which you can follow for more information. Just because it’s a tweet doesn’t mean it’s automatically a bad source for your research. Important scientists, historians, and journalists use social media and often share information on these platforms with links to more information. 

Some of you only answered one part of this question.  Of course, there are several ways to assess the credibility of the tweet, and many of you did this effectively.  However, this question was not about credibility it was about usefulness.  When determining whether you want to use a source, credibility is only one factor that you need to consider:   

The truth is that absolutely any source could be both “useful” for some research purposes, and “not useful” for others. It all depends on what the research questions are.  A tweet might be a bad source if the researcher wants to prove or understand the nuances or specifics of a situation.  A tweet can hide biases, and/or take numbers out of context.  Another problem – many audiences might not trust evidence that comes from a tweet.

On the other hand, this tweet could be an excellent source for a researcher investigating how gun control attitudes are expressed through popular media.  In those cases, the credibility of the source might not even be relevant.  The key is for researchers to make good decisions about whether a source is sufficiently credible, relevant and appropriate to serve their research purposes.  

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1

1. The “We Know You’ve Got a Story” banner is an advertisement. (a) The banner appears to have been put there by the editor of the online news publication to influence the thinking of the readers and persuade them to purchase it. Advertisements are used to grab the attention of consumers and attract them to buy a product or service (Alalwan, 2018). Consumers’ purchase decisions heavily rely on advertisements as they give the consumers reasons for purchasing a product or service. The banner can be effective in influencing consumers’ purchase intentions by invoking their thoughts on the stories in the news publication. 

           2. The “Should California Stop Growing Almonds” block is an article that provides information on the growing of almonds in California. (a) Although the author of the article is stated, it does not qualify to be an advertisement as the sponsor is not indicated. Advertisements in news publications are mostly identified with labels that make the ads different from other articles (Amazeen & Muddiman, 2018). These labels are designed to make advertisements look different from other news articles, although it can still be challenging to determine what comprises an advert due to the tactics publishers use to present advertisements as articles. 

           3. The “Real Reasons Women Don’t Go Into Tech” block is an advertisement, which informs readers about women’s involvement in careers in technology. (a) What makes it easy to identify the block as an advertisement is the inclusion of the words “Sponsored content” which is written in a different font and color to differentiate it from the other information (Amazeen & Muddiman, 2018). The word “sponsored” is commonly used to identify ads that are cloaked in the guise of stories. The advertisement targets a specific audience (women) or even spreads awareness because the issue is of public interest, which can be described as covert & public-serving advertising (Wojdynski & Evans, 2020). 

           4. The post provides strong evidence of how the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant has affected the surrounding environment. The article is accompanied by a picture that portrays the impact of the power plant on the vegetation in the surroundings. The reader can easily relate to the author by observing the abnormalities in the flowers. The deformations suggest the radiation from the nuclear power plant disaster affects the structural development of the plant’s flowers (Matsala et al., 2022). The post can be used to show what happens when plants are exposed to nuclear radiation. The picture used in the post communicates to the reader by showing the defects associated with the nuclear accident in the environment.

           5. The tweet might be a useful source of information for research because Moveon.org is a reputable organization. The information in the tweet was obtained from survey data that was collected from 816 gun owners, which is not a small sample size. The size of the sample influences the validity of the information collected from the sample. (a) The tweet might not be useful because there could be factors that influenced the decisions made by the individuals interviewed. The information posted on social media is mostly designed to influence the reader, which limits its credibility (Kim et al., 2019). 

           6. The activity has been educative as it enhanced my understanding of the analysis of what constitutes an advertisement in a news article. It can be difficult to differentiate a news article from an advertisement posted in the form of a news article as there are no major differences. It is important to identify the labels that publishers use to distinguish advertisements from news articles. The other important thing learned from the activity is the need to understand how the information presented in an article would be interpreted by the reader. The reader should be able to get the targeted objective of the author after reading a published post. 

References

Alalwan, A. A. (2018). Investigating the impact of social media advertising features on customer purchase intention. 
International Journal of Information Management, 42, 65-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2018.06.001

Amazeen, M. A., & Muddiman, A. R. (2018). Saving media or trading on trust? The effects of native advertising on audience perceptions of legacy and online news publishers.
Digital Journalism, 6(2), 176-195. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2017.1293488

Kim, A., Moravec, P. L., & Dennis, A. R. (2019). Combating fake news on social media with source ratings: The effects of user and expert reputation ratings.
Journal of Management Information Systems, 36(3), 931-968. https://doi.org/10.1080/07421222.2019.1628921

Matsala, M., Senf, C., Bilous, A., Diachuk, P., Zadorozhniuk, R., Burianchuk, M., & Seidl, R. (2022). The impact of radioactive contamination on tree regeneration and forest development in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.
Applied Vegetation Science, 25(1), e12631.

Wojdynski, B. W., & Evans, N. J. (2020). The covert advertising recognition and effects (CARE) model: Processes of persuasion in native advertising and other masked formats.
International Journal of Advertising, 39(1), 4-31. https://doi.org/10.1080/02650487.2019.1658438

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