Total rewards part ii: milestone two: external competitiveness

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 For this milestone, you will need to reference your previous work on job evaluation points from Milestone One Internal Consistency: Job Evaluation. 

 Overview: The importance of compensation varies depending on the viewpoint, as described by Barry Gerhart and Jerry Newman in Compensation. Society views compensation as a measure of justice; managers may view compensation as a major expense or a motivator; employees view compensation as an entitlement or as an incentive. Regardless of the viewpoint, fairness and equity are essential. Compensation must also be up-to-date, competitive in the market, and easy to understand. 

 Aligned pay structures support the way the work gets done, fit the organization’s business strategy, and are fair to employees. Organizations typically task an in-house human resource (HR) professional or hire an HR consultant to create and maintain the company’s pay structure. 

 Prompt: Salary Surveys: To ensure the pay structure is externally competitive, a salary survey should be conducted, as stated by Lisa Burke in Designing a Pay Structure. For the results of a survey to be valid, the market pay data must be from a relevant labor market. Since most of the office support, HR, and operations jobs will be filled by regional candidates, local pay data should be gathered. 

 A salary survey is developed by your team and sent to industry competitors. Descriptive data such as organization size, industry, annual revenue as well as compensation data for each of the benchmark jobs were collected. Surveys were completed and returned by six organizations that recruit and hire similar positions within a 90-mile radius of Rockville. Base pay data from the responding organizations are reflected in Appendix B of the Final Project Case Study.  Organizations are referenced as companies A, B, C, D, E, and F for anonymity. Those who participated also received copies of the results for their contribution.

 In this assignment, you will address the external competitiveness component of a pay structure using the specifically designed case scenario. Read the Final Project Case Study (linked to in your course) for detailed information on the requirements for this project.  

 Specifically, you must address the critical elements listed below.  

 External Competitiveness: 

 A. Calculate the weighted means of base pay for each of the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager from the six companies listed in Appendix B of the final project case study. 

 B. Calculate the predicted base pay for each of the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager. 

 C. Create a market pay line using the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager.  Clearly label your job evaluation points and salaries. 

 D. Calculate the adjusted pay rates for each benchmark job based on your company’s decision to lead in base pay by 3%.  

 E. Create pay grades by combining benchmark jobs that are substantially comparable for pay purposes. Clearly label your pay grades and explain why you combined any benchmark jobs to form a grade 

 F. Create pay ranges including minimum and maximum for each of the pay grades based on pay grades created in item E above. 

 Guidelines for Submission: Your final project will be a Word document, approximately 8–9 pages in length (plus a cover page and references) and must be written in APA format. Your Word document may include Word tables, Word lists, Excel screenshots, and rationale in written paragraphs. Use double spacing, 12- point Times New Roman font, and one-inch margins 

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OL 325 Milestone Two Guidelines and Rubric

Overview: The importance of compensation varies depending on the viewpoint, as described by Barry Gerhart and Jerry Newman in Compensation. Society
views compensation as a measure of justice; managers may view compensation as a major expense or a motivator; employees view compensation as an
entitlement or as an incentive. Regardless of the viewpoint, fairness and equity are essential. Compensation must also be up-to-date, competitive in the market,
and easy to understand.

Aligned pay structures support the way the work gets done, fit the organization’s business strategy, and are fair to employees. Organizations typically task an in-
house human resource (HR) professional or hire an HR consultant to create and maintain the company’s pay structure.

Prompt: Salary Surveys: To ensure the pay structure is externally competitive, a salary survey should be conducted, as stated by Lisa Burke in Designing a
Pay Structure. For the results of a survey to be valid, the market pay data must be from a relevant labor market. Since most of the office support, HR, and
operations jobs will be filled by regional candidates, local pay data should be gathered.

A salary survey is developed by your team and sent to industry competitors. Descriptive data such as organization size, industry, annual revenue as well as
compensation data for each of the benchmark jobs were collected. Surveys were completed and returned by six organizations that recruit and hire similar
positions within a 90-mile radius of Rockville. Base pay data from the responding organizations are reflected in Appendix B of the Final Project Case Study.
Organizations are referenced as companies A, B, C, D, E, and F for anonymity. Those who participated also received copies of the results for their
contribution.

In this assignment, you will address the external competitiveness component of a pay structure using the specifically designed case scenario. Read the Final
Project Case Study (linked to in your course) for detailed information on the requirements for this project.

Specifically, you must address the critical elements listed below.

External Competitiveness:

A. Calculate the weighted means of base pay for each of the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker,
and benefits manager from the six companies listed in Appendix B of the final project case study.

B. Calculate the predicted base pay for each of the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and
benefits manager.

C. Create a market pay line using the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager.
Clearly label your job evaluation points and salaries.

D. Calculate the adjusted pay rates for each benchmark job based on your company’s decision to lead in base pay by 3%.
E. Create pay grades by combining benchmark jobs that are substantially comparable for pay purposes. Clearly label your pay grades and explain why

you combined any benchmark jobs to form a grade.

2

F. Create pay ranges including minimum and maximum for each of the pay grades based on pay grades created in item E above.

Rubric
Guidelines for Submission: Your final project will be a Word document, approximately 8–9 pages in length (plus a cover page and references) and must be
written in APA format. Your Word document may include Word tables, Word lists, Excel screenshots, and rationale in written paragraphs. Use double spacing, 12-
point Times New Roman font, and one-inch margins.

Critical Elements Proficient (100%) Needs Improvement (70%) Not Evident (0%) Value

External Competitiveness:
Weighted Means

Provides correct weighted means for
each benchmark job identified

Provides incorrect weighted means for
some of the benchmark jobs or
provides weighted means for all
benchmark jobs with consistent
computational errors

Does not provide weighted means for
benchmark jobs

15

External Competitiveness:
Predicted Base Pay

Provides correct predicted base pay for
each benchmark job identified

Provides incorrect predicted base pay
for some of the benchmark jobs or
provides predicted base pay for all
benchmark jobs with consistent
computational errors

Does not provide predicted base pay for
benchmark jobs

15

External Competitiveness:
Market Pay Line

Provides correct market pay line for
each benchmark job identified with
clear labeling of job evaluation points
and salaries

Provides incorrect market pay line for
some of the benchmark jobs or
provides market line but does not
clearly label job evaluation points and
salaries

Does not provide market pay line for
benchmark jobs and does not clearly
label job evaluation points and salaries

15

External Competitiveness:
Adjusted Pay Rates

Provides correct adjusted pay rates for
each benchmark job identified

Provides incorrect adjusted pay rates for
some of the benchmark jobs or
provides weighted means for all
benchmark jobs with consistent
computational errors

Does not provide adjusted pay rates for
benchmark jobs

15

External Competitiveness:
Pay Grades

Provides correct pay grades for
combined benchmark jobs, labels pay
grades incorrectly, and explains why
combined benchmark jobs form a grade

Provides incorrect pay grades for
combined benchmark jobs or labels pay
grades incorrectly or does not explain
why combined benchmark jobs form a
grade

Does not provide pay grades for
combined benchmark jobs, does not
label pay grades correctly, and does not
explain why combine benchmark jobs
form a grade

15

External Competitiveness:
Pay Ranges

Provides correct pay ranges for each pay
grade and provides rationale for pay
ranges

Provides incorrect pay ranges for some
pay grades or does not include rationale

Does not provide pay ranges for pay
grades and does not provide rationale

15

3

Critical Elements Proficient (100%) Needs Improvement (70%) Not Evident (0%) Value

Articulation of Response Submission has no major errors related
to grammar, spelling, syntax,
organization, or citations

Submission has major errors related to
grammar, spelling, syntax, organization,
or citations that negatively impact
readability and articulation of main
ideas

Submission has critical errors related to
grammar, spelling, syntax, organization,
or citations that prevent understanding
of ideas

10

Total 100%

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OL 325 Final Project Case Study:
Designing a Pay Structure

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Table of Contents
OL 325 Final Project Case Study: Designing a Pay Structure …………………………………………………………… 3

Internal Consistency ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4

Job Descriptions …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Job Evaluation ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4

Job Families ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5

External Competitiveness ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Weighted Means ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Predicted Market Pay Rate …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

Market Pay Line ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8

Adjusted Pay Rates ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

Pay Grades ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

Pay Ranges ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10

References ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11

Appendix A—Job Descriptions for Benchmark Jobs …………………………………………………………………….. 12

Front Desk Receptionist ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

Administrative Assistant …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13

Operations Analyst ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 14

Appendix B—Results from Salary Survey ………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

Front Desk Receptionist ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15

Administrative Assistant …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16

Operations Analyst ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Production Worker ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18

Benefits Manager ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 19

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OL 325 Final Project Case Study: Designing a Pay Structure

The importance of compensation varies depending on the viewpoint (Gerhart & Newman, 2020). Society
views compensation as a measure of justice; managers may view compensation as a major expense or a
motivator; employees view compensation as an entitlement or as an incentive. Regardless of the
viewpoint, fairness and equity are essential. Compensation must also be up-to-date, competitive in the
market, and easy to understand.

Aligned pay structures support the way the work gets done, fit the organization’s business strategy, and
are fair to employees. Organizations typically task an in-house human resource (HR) professional or hire
an HR consultant to create and maintain the company’s pay structure. In this final project, you will
design a pay structure using this specially designed final project case scenario.

You are the human resource director for a premier supplier of rubber floor mats and matting that is
expanding its production operations to Rockville, MD. The organization is headquartered in San Antonio,
TX. Based on the organization’s mission statement, the company’s goal is to provide top-quality
products with customer service that well exceeds expectations and with a strong commitment to
continuous improvement. The following personnel are required to start the Rockville operation (the
numbers in parentheses indicate the number of positions):

• Director of regional operations
• Assistant to the director of operations
• Operations analyst (2)
• HR director (this is you)
• HR administrative assistant
• Benefits manager
• Lead production worker (3)
• Production worker (10)
• Production manager
• HR generalist
• Front desk receptionist

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Internal Consistency

Review this section for support with Milestone One. Also, refer to Appendix A for the section on job
descriptions.

Job Descriptions

Job analysis is central to many HR functions, especially compensation. It is the systematic process of
collecting information for a specific job and provides information needed to define that job (Gerhart &
Newman, 2020). A job description is a summary of the most important features of a job. We need to
understand what tasks, duties, and responsibilities various jobs entail before we can assign fair and
competitive pay rates.

Writing a job description starts with job analysis. At times, it is appropriate to gather information from
other job descriptions such as previous company descriptions or O*NET (an online job analysis resource
developed by the Department of Labor). A link to O*NET can be found in Module Three’s Reading and
Resources area. A company’s job description should be personalized, specific to the job, and tailored to
the company. Job descriptions vary by organization but often include the job title, a job summary,
essential job tasks, job-relevant knowledge, and skills that an incumbent must possess. A well-written,
detailed job description provides a foundation to any internally consistent compensation system.

A benchmark job is a job used as a reference point for making pay comparisons. They typically have
well-known stable roles with pay rates that are generally acceptable (Gerhart & Newman, 2020).
Appendix A contains job descriptions of four benchmark jobs for this case study.

Job Evaluation
A job evaluation is the systematic procedure designed to aid in establishing pay differentials among jobs
within an organization (Gerhart & Newman, 2020). The first step is to identify compensable factors.

A compensable factor is a characteristic within the work which the company values (Gerhart & Newman,
2020). It is used for evaluating the relative worth of jobs inside an organization. We also need to assign a
relative weight to each compensable factor based on their importance to the organization. Keep in mind
that all compensable factors added together must total 100%. An example of a compensable factor
might be education. The company might weigh this at 25%.

Each compensable factor will have varying levels of difficulty. This is referred to as degrees.

For example, the degrees for education level might be identified as:

1 = High School/GED
2 = Associate’s
3 = Bachelor’s
4 = Master’s/Graduate

Next, points are calculated by multiplying the degrees by the weights.

Below is an example of how this point structure is applied to the front desk receptionist.

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The weight of the skill compensable factor (divided into education level and technical skills) is at 50%
since the organization is very knowledge-intensive and depends heavily on its human capital;
responsibility (distributed into scope of control and impact of job) is weighted 30% as each job has the
potential to affect other jobs; and effort is assigned 20% since problem-solving and task complexity are
essential across jobs in the organization.

Using the job description as a reference, the degrees for the front desk receptionist position need to be
assigned. Education degree 1 is appropriate for this position since a high school diploma or GED is
sufficient; technical skills degree 1 is suitable as this position handles basic telephone and email only;
responsibility scope of control degree 1 is also sufficient as this position has little control; impact of job
degree 2 is fitting since this position greets every person entering the establishment; etc.

Lastly, multiply the weights by the degree for each compensable fact. Add the total points of each
compensable factor to get your total job evaluation points for the front desk receptionist position.

Job Evaluation for Front Desk Receptionist

Compensable Factor Weight Degree (1, 2, 3, 4) Points

Skill (50%)

-Education Level 25% 1 25

-Technical Skills 25% 1 25

Responsibility (30%)

-Scope of Control 10% 1 10

-Impact of Job 20% 2 40

Effort (20%)

-Problem Solving 10% 1 10

-Task Complexity 10% 1 10

100% 120 points

Table 1

Job Families
A job family is a group of jobs involving work of the same nature but requiring different skill and
responsibility levels (Gerhart & Newman, 2020). Grouping similar jobs provides a basis for relevant
comparisons. Such groupings lead to reasonable pay differences between positions, logical career
pathing, and internally consistent job structures. Organizations may use different evaluation methods,
pay strategies, or pay structures for different job families within the same organization.

Below is an example of two job families for a financial company. Note: This example is not from this case
study.

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Example of job families:

 Accounting family
 Staff accountant
 Senior accountant

 Investment family
 Investment analyst
 Investment accounts manager

Table 2

The positions needed for the new Rockville location fall into several different job families such as
production, office support, and human resources.

External Competitiveness

Review this section for support with Milestone Two. Also, refer to Appendix B for your work on
weighted means.

Weighted Means
The first step in analyzing the pay data is to generate the weighted means for each benchmark job.
Weighted means, as compared to simple means, are calculated to better represent the market data
(Burke, 2008, as cited in Milkovich & Newman). A simple mean would be calculated by adding up the
average base pay rates and dividing by the number of organizations, but small and large companies
would both be given the same weight if using a simple mean. A weighted mean gives equal weight to
each job incumbent’s wage and, therefore, is more representative of the data. Below is an example of
how to calculate a weighted mean. This example uses sample data from surveys of two companies.
Note: The numbers used are not from the data in this case study. See Appendix B to complete this
section for your milestone.

To calculate the weighted mean:
Simple mean = average base and divide by number of companies

(21,000 + 22,000) / 2 = 21,500

Weighted mean = equal weight to each job incumbent’s wage

(1/3 x 21,000) + (2/3 x 22000) = 21,666

Table 3

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Predicted Market Pay Rate
The next task is to conduct a simple regression using Microsoft Excel. This will allow us to calculate the
predicted base pay and create a market pay line, which allows an organization to interpret the market
data as usable information. Create a table in Excel for each benchmark job with a column for the job
evaluation points from Milestone One—Internal Consistency: Job Evaluation and a column for the
weighted average base pay rates from Milestone Two—External Competitiveness: Weighted Means.
Next, generate the regression results. Below are the steps of a simple regression in Excel using a sample
dataset. Note: The numbers used are not from the data in this case study.

To run a simple regression in Microsoft Excel:
 Open Microsoft Excel

 Create a table with the data to be analyzed (job titles, base pay, evaluation points)

 Click on Data tab (ensure Data Analysis tool is set up under add-ons*)

 Click on Data Analysis

 Click on Regression

o In the Input Y Range, select your weighted average base pay data (from previous step)

o In the Input X Range, select your job evaluation points data (from Milestone One)

 Click OK

*Refer to activity prompt in Brightspace for instructions on Data Analysis tool setup.

Table 4

The output will provide you with an R Square. This statistic signifies the variance explained in the data.
The R Square tells us how well the regression line fits the data. This should be 0.95 or higher. If your
number is low, review your data (that is, job evaluation points) for any discrepancies or inconsistencies.
Correct any errors and rerun your regression, as needed.

Using the regression output, identify the slope and y-intercept. Calculate the predicted market pay rate
using the formula y = a + b (x) for each benchmark job. Below is an example of a simple regression
output in Excel using a sample dataset. Note: The numbers used are not from the data in this case study.

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How to read your simple regression:
y = the predicted base pay
x = the slope of the line
a = the y-intercept
b = the slope of the line

Using this dataset above, we can predict the market pay rate for the front desk receptionist
position:
y = a + b (x)
y = y-intercept + slope (evaluation points)
y = -23335.92 + 356.31 (120)
y = 19,421.28

Table 5

With that information, you will now be able to calculate the predicted base pay for each of the following
benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, payroll assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and
benefits manager.

Market Pay Line
Now that we have our predicted market pay rate, we need to create a market pay line. A market pay
line links a company’s benchmark job evaluation points with market rates paid by competitors (Gerhart
& Newman, 2020). We can do this by creating a trend line with our predicted salaries.

First, place the positions in order smallest to largest based on job evaluation points. Then create a chart
in Excel, placing your job evaluation points along the horizontal axis and the salary along the vertical
axis. This should form a gradual inclining line. Below is an example of a market line in Excel using a
sample dataset. Note: The numbers used are not from the data in this case study.

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Example of market pay line:

Figure 1

Adjusted Pay Rates
Now that we have our predicted market pay rate and pay line, we need to adjust it based on the
organization’s lead pay level strategy. This will be our pay policy line. Since the organization wants to
lead the market by 3% across the operations, office support, and HR job families, we need to adjust the
market pay line accordingly. In other words, each predicted pay rate can be multiplied by 1.03 to get a
new base pay rate that is 3% above the market. Below is an example of a 3% adjusted pay rate based on
the previous market line example. Note: The numbers used are not from the data in this case study.

Example of adjusted pay rates:

Job Title Market Pay Adjust Pay Rates

Front desk receptionist $19,421 $20,003

Administrative assistant $29,134 $30,008

Payroll assistant $40,134 $41,338

Operations analyst $54,801 $56,445

Benefits manager $65,802 $67,776

Table 6

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Pay Grades
Once the pay rates are created, we can construct pay grades for our pay structure. Pay grades
characterize groupings of jobs that are comparable for pay purposes (Gerhart & Newman, 2020). They
are of similar value to the organization. All the jobs in a pay grade share the same pay range (minimum
and maximum pay rates).

Examine the following benchmark jobs: administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker,
and benefits manager. Determine which ones are sufficiently similar for compensation purposes. Below
is an example of two pay grades. Note: the positions are for illustration purposes only.

Example of pay grades:

 Pay Grade A
 Front desk receptionist

 Pay Grade B
 Administrative assistant
 Payroll assistant

Table 7

Pay Ranges

Pay ranges create upper and lower pay rates for each job in the pay grade (Gerhart & Newman, 2020).
These are the limits the employer will pay for a particular job. Each pay grade will have a minimum and
maximum pay rate. Percent guidelines are used to determine how far above and below the midpoint the
pay range will reach. For example, the maximum might be 10% above the midpoint and the minimum
might be 10% below the midpoint. Note: All jobs in a pay grade will have the same minimum and
maximum pay rates. Below is an example of pay ranges for two pay grades. Note: The numbers used are
not from the data in this case study.

Example of pay ranges:

Pay Grade Minimum Average Maximum

A $18,002 (-10%) $20,003 $22,003 (+10%)

B $32,105 (-10%) $35,673 $39,240 (+10%)

Table 8

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References

Burke, L. (2008). Designing a pay structure. SHRM. https://www.shrm.org/certification/for-
organizations/academic-alignment/faculty-
resources/Documents/Designing%20a%20Pay%20Structure_IM_9.08.pdf

Gerhart, B., & Newman, J. (2020). Compensation (13th ed.). McGraw-Hill

Martocchio, J. (2020). Strategic compensation: A human resource management approach (10th ed.).

Pearson.

Milkovich, G., & Newman, J. (2008). Compensation. McGraw-Hill Irwin.

U.S. Department of Labor. (2020). O*NET Online. https://www.onetonline.org/

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Appendix A—Job Descriptions for Benchmark Jobs
(U.S. Department of Labor, 2020)

Front Desk Receptionist

Job Summary
Answer inquiries and obtain information for the general public, customers, visitors, and other interested
parties. Provide information regarding activities conducted at the establishment, location of
departments, offices, and employees within the organization.

Essential Job Tasks

• Operate telephone to answer, screen, and forward calls, providing information, taking messages,
and scheduling appointments.

• Greet persons entering the establishment, determine nature and purpose of visit, and direct or
escort them to specific destinations.

• Hear and resolve complaints from customers and the public.
• Transmit information or documents to customers, using email, mail, or fax machine.
• Analyze data to determine answers to questions from customers or members of the public.
• Provide information about the establishment, such as the location of departments or offices,

employees within the organization, or services provided.

Job Context
Indoor, environmentally controlled; telephone; contact with others.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities

• Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes
customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer
satisfaction.

• Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing,
managing files and records, taking and organizing messages, and other office procedures and
terminology.

• Awareness of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
• Gives full attention to what other people are saying, taking the time to understand the points being

made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
• Actively looks for ways to help people.
• Manages own time and the time of others.
• Talks to others to convey information effectively.
• Knowledge of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of

composition, and grammar.
• Understands written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.
• Communicates effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

13

Administrative Assistant

Job Summary
Provide administrative support by conducting research, preparing reports, handling information requests, and
performing clerical functions such as preparing correspondence, receiving visitors, arranging conference calls, and
scheduling meetings.

Essential Job Tasks

• Manage and maintain executives’ schedules.
• Prepare invoices, reports, memos, letters, financial statements, and other documents, using word processing,

spreadsheet, database, or presentation software.
• Read and analyze incoming memos, submissions, and reports to determine their significance and plan their

distribution.
• Open, sort, and distribute incoming correspondence, including faxes and email.
• File and retrieve corporate documents, records, and reports.
• Greet visitors and determine whether they should be given access to specific individuals.
• Prepare responses to correspondence containing routine inquiries.
• Perform general office duties such as ordering supplies, maintaining records, management systems, and

performing basic bookkeeping work.
• Make travel arrangements for executives.

Job Context
Indoor, environmentally controlled; telephone; contact with others.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities

• Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and
records, designing and completing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.

• Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer
needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

• Knowledge of computer hardware and software.
• Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words,

rules of composition, and grammar.
• Gives full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking

questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
• Monitors/assess performance of self, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take

corrective action.
• Manages own time and the time of others.
• Talks to others to convey information effectively.
• Understands written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.
• Communicates effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
• Adjusts actions concerning others’ actions.

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Operations Analyst

Job Summary
Formulate and apply mathematical modeling and other optimizing methods using a computer to develop and
interpret information that assists management with decision making or other managerial functions. Frequently
concentrates on collecting and analyzing data using decision support software.

Essential Job Tasks

• Analyze information obtained from management to conceptualize and define operational problems.
• Collaborate with senior managers and decision-makers to identify and solve a variety of problems and to clarify

management objectives.
• Define data requirements and then gather and validate information, applying judgment.
• Study and analyze information about alternative courses of action to determine which plan will offer the best

outcome.
• Prepare management reports defining and evaluating problems and identifying solutions.
• Formulate mathematical or simulation models of problems, relating constants and variables, restrictions,

alternatives, conflicting objectives, and their parameters.

Job Context
Indoor, environmentally controlled; telephone; contact with others.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities

• Knowledge and application of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, and statistics.
• Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles,

techniques, procedures, and equipment.
• Knowledge of computer hardware and software including applications and programming.
• Identifies complex problems and reviews related information to develop and evaluate options and implement

solutions.
• Uses logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions, or

approaches to problems.
• Analyzes needs and product requirements to create a design.
• Determines how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will

affect outcomes.
• Considers the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to determine the course of action.
• Understands the implications of new information for both current and future problem solving and decision

making.
• Knowledge of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and

grammar.
• Understands written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.
• Communicates effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

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Appendix B—Results from Salary Survey
(adapted from Burke, 2008)

Front Desk Receptionist

Company # of Job Incumbents Average Base Pay

A 1 $27,000

B 2 $25,500

C 1 $29,500

D 2 $31,000

E 2 $26,500

F 1 $26,000

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Administrative Assistant

Company # of Job Incumbents Average Base Pay

A 4 $37,500

B 4 $32,000

C 3 $33,000

D 5 $39,000

E 4 $36,500

F 4 $35,000

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Operations Analyst

Company # of Job Incumbents Base Pay

A 2 $63,500

B 4 $59,000

C 3 $61,000

D 5 $67,000

E 3 $63,500

F 3 $65,000

18

Production Worker

Company # of Job Incumbents Base Pay

A 9 $27,500

B 12 $25,000

C 11 $31,000

D 13 $33,000

E 8 $29,000

F 10 $28,500

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Benefits Manager

Company # of Job Incumbents Base Pay

A 1 $62,000

B 2 $57,500

C 1 $63,000

D 1 $67,000

E 2 $62,000

F 1 $65,000

Running Head: MILESTONE ONE

1

MILESTONE ONE

12

Milestone One

Tim Weaver

OL 325 Total Rewards

Southern New Hampshire University

January 23, 2022

A. Create complete job descriptions for the benefits manager and production worker position using O*NET. Note: There may be several versions of these positions on O*NET. You should create personalized job descriptions that are tailored to the company.

i. Job descriptions for the benefits manager

The benefits manager provides the organization’s employees the monetary value for the work they do based on the policies of the company. Some of the company’s benefits include bonuses, packages, salary, etc. Therefore, a company uses employee benefits to identify, keep and motivate employees for the job well done.

Key responsibilities

All the benefits managers that are really passionate about dealing with other employees need to embrace the following few well-used and tested tips that others have tried benefit managers:-

Experience

· Diversity. Understand the word not just in the terms of ethnicity, religion or culture but norms, rituals, values, virtues and perception

· Learn to be neutral in all sense. As a benefit manager, an individual must never have a hidden bias or prejudice as it will cause them to put on multiple layers/coat of lenses to view people, their attitudes and their actions. Their concern and focus is only on their job performance.

· Balance the feelings between work and people. Work is work and people are people. They need people to work and work requires people. They would need to spend a lot of time reading people, observing people, finding out underlying reasons for their behaviours and actions and relate them to HOW the work has been done, what is to be improved on and how to improve them.

· Emotions, tensions and aggression sometimes run high. As a benefit manager, you must never lose your temper, shout, admonish or do very “unprofessional” things even though your boss might be screaming at you to do it. Your boss only knows his rights; not that of the employee or the union of which he/she belongs to or legal policies subjected by the government and the HR Ministry. Sometimes, you might need to “undo” your bosses’ orders or instructions because they infringe on any of those rights. If not, as the benefit, you will be first one to face court charges as you are the valid representative of the organization’s HR sector, not your boss.

Qualifications;

· A diploma in HR will be fine

· Good interpersonal skills and an approachable, warm and friendly demeanour. Don’t forget patience, intuition

· Learn a little (on your own) about your company’s business, the jobs that people do in the other departments of your company

· Pick up psychology on your own if your course did not first give you an impression you needed it.

· Knows the laws and policies of your country and your company

· Read up areas on ethics and morality and how it often happens as dilemmas in every office (because people never do what they say they do honestly, truthfully and to the letter).

ii. Job descriptions for the production worker

The production worker has five responsibilities. Materials delivery and inventory is the first job. Knowing what parts are needed for the next weeks production and finding out where these parts are at is the production workers job. Lean manufacturing demands that all parts be delivered in a timely manner so that parts are not stored for months and arrive in time to be put on the assembly line with minimal handling. Next, the production manager has to be aware of timelines and delivery dates so that all products produced are delivered to the customer on time. Third, there is a need to communicate with all levels of management. These include maintenance, human resources, customer service and labour relations (Lipińska-Grobelny & Wasiak, 2010). Next, budget is important. Not only must goods be produced on time but they must be produced for a reasonable cost that includes profit and overhead. Finally, product quality control is the responsibility of the production manager. Products need to be periodically reviewed for conformity to specifications. Raw materials need to be tested for compliance with specifications. The last step occurs on the loading dock making sure all products produced are packaged properly and loaded on the truck in a manner that will minimize damage during shipment. Source: Quality Control Engineer for Army Armament Command.

Key responsibilities

A production worker’s job is somewhat similar like project manager. He/she is responsible for managing and organising the entire operation of film production like needs of production staff, assisting day to day production tasks, managing production schedule and making sure that there shouldn’t be any delay etc.

The core skills for this role are the budgeting and accounting. He/she should be experienced in these two skills set as this would be the primarily responsibilities for production manager (Lipińska-Grobelny & Wasiak, 2010). He/she should be effective in creating budget and in order to make budget he/she should have a strong understanding of the film industry like staff costing, electrician rate, production assistant cost, catering service cost and other days to day expenses. Apart from budgeting and accounting there are other set of responsibilities which a production manager should showcase and there are:

· Leadership: he/she will be in charge of leading a whole crew. A production manager should know about work delegations. he/she should effectively discuss the day to day tasks with his/her crew and delegate it to them.

· Communication: be confident and communicate in way that is understandable and concise. a large portion of the day for production manager is going to be spent talking to people and making sure that everything is going smooth and on time.

· Negotiating: as a production manager he/she should be able to negotiate deals and contracts all the time as it’s his/her job to set the budget as wisely as possible.

· Maintain schedule: it is production manager job to make sure that production runs to schedule and reporting the progress to producers.

· To inspect the job, Process, working of workers etc.

· To maintain ERP of company.

· To increase the production with minimum rejection as well as to maintain report.

· Also there are many duties such to meet customer requirement, to interact with client, to maintain shop floor etc. Also production Engineer can work in any sector as per your interest.

B. Calculate the job evaluation points for the administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager jobs. Provide a rationale for assigning specific weights and degrees to the various jobs. Use the job descriptions you created in section one, as well as the job descriptions in Appendix A of the final project case study, as a reference. Note: The weights, broken down by the compensable factors, must total 100%.

i. Job evaluation for the administrative assistant

Compensation factor Job evaluation for administrative assistant

Degree (1,2,3,4)weight Points

Skill (50%)

Level of education120%20

Degree of technical skills130%30

Responsibility (30%)

scope of control210%20

Impact of Job220%40

Effort (20%)

Degree of problem-solving220%10

Task complexity110%10

Total points130

ii. Job evaluation for the operations analyst

Compensation factor Job evaluation for administrative assistant

Degree (1,2,3,4)weight Points

Skill (50%)

Level of education110%10

Degree of technical skills220%20

Responsibility (30%)

scope of control330%30

Impact of Job220%20

Effort (20%)

Degree of problem-solving320%20

Task complexity210%10

Total points110

iii. Job evaluation for the operations analyst

Compensation factor Job evaluation for administrative assistant

Degree (1,2,3,4)weight Points

Skill (50%)

Level of education330%30

Degree of technical skills440%40

Responsibility (30%)

scope of control220%20

Impact of Job440%40

Effort (20%)

Degree of problem-solving550%50

Task complexity330%30

Total points210

iv. Job evaluation for the benefits manager

Compensation factor Job evaluation for administrative assistant

Degree (1,2,3,4,5)weight Points

Skill (50%)

Level of education330%30

Degree of technical skills550%50

Responsibility (30%)

scope of control440%40

Impact of Job550%50

Effort (20%)

Degree of problem-solving440%40

Task complexity550%50

Total points260

The Rationale for Assigning Specific Weights and Degrees to the above Jobs

A pay survey must often be conducted by the benefits manager to ensure the pay structure is competitive across every department within the organization. In addition, the market pay data must be collected from the appropriate labour markets for every benchmarked job to ensure all the pay survey data collected are valid (Lee et al. 2014). One of the most useful data to be used is the regional pay data that is collected because most of the administrative assistant, operations analyst, production worker, and benefits manager jobs will be filled with various candidates. Moreover, there is often a significant need to develop a harmonized pay survey and give it to the industry competitors for appropriate action. Another important source of the pay survey information is the descriptive organization data which belongs to the size, industry and annual revenue and the compensation data. However, the education level for each candidate is often important in driving a complex control and impact of every job. Although a company might often need an administrative assistant to perform most of the duties, such an employee who cannot effectively perform their duties can paralyze the entire organization in most cases. However, in case an operations personnel or analyst stopped identifying certain problems that affect the organization or evaluate the issues then such problems would negatively affect the company (Sostrin, 2013). That is so because the degree of their task’s complexity is much higher than that of an administrative assistant. Finally, the job of a manager is another one that can be more complex in nature and that would require an individual to perform the job duties assigned to them while managing others also, and that usually lead to the complexity of the position.

B. Create job families for all the roles at the Rockville location. The families may be illustrated in a table or bullet format. List positions within each family based on the difficulty level. Provide a rationale for why jobs were assigned to the various families.

Job Families

Job Family Name

Nature of Work

Examples

Top Managers

Driving force behind the company; he or she will make things happen, put together the resources to support the company and take the product to the market place.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or President

Chief Operating Officer (COO), Vice President of Operations or General Manager

Vice President of Marketing or Marketing Manager

Chief Financial Officer (CFO) or Controller

Vice President of Production or Production Manager

Key personnel

Leaders for the operation and has overall responsibility for the financial success of the business. The operations manager handles external relations with lenders, community leaders and vendors. Frequently, this individual also is in charge of either production or marketing for the business. This person will set in motion the vision, strategic plan and goals for the business.

Operations manager.

Quality control, safety, environmental manager.

Accountant, bookkeeper, controller

Office manager. 

Receptionist. 

Foreperson, supervisor, lead person

Marketing manager

Purchasing manager

Shipping and receiving person or manager.

Professional staff

Engineers/technicians

The work of an engineer typically includes designing and programming system-level software: operating systems, database systems, embedded systems and so on. They understand how both software and hardware function. The work can involve talking to clients and colleagues to assess and define what solution or system is needed, which means there is a lot of interaction as well as full-on technical work. Software engineers are often found in electronics and telecommunications companies. A computing, software engineering or related higher degree is often needed.

Software engineer

Systems analyst

Business analyst

Technical support

Network engineer

Technical consultant

Technical sales

Web developer

Software tester

Business Experts

One could argue that the absolute minimum is just sales/biz. And you then contract development – not advisable, but doable to develop an MVP – perhaps this is what David was referring to with just the Entrepreneur in the beginning. Even in mature companies the ‘sales guys are always selling stuff we haven’t built yet’ – often true and much of the time necessary. Sell the vision, build an MVP (min. viable product), validate with customers, rinse, and repeat. Once you have the nucleus of a product that genuine customers with money have bought/WILL buy, then the next add is probably dedicated sales:

Entrepreneur/sales/business in one package

Tech

Sales and marketing

You need to get customers lined up ready to buy before rev1 is ready. with customers lined up you will probably need to add to the tech team and if you can afford it a product person to focus FT on getting rev1 finished in alignment with customer needs.

Sales/biz/entrepreneur

Tech

Sales

References

Lee, Y., Choo, J., Cho, J., Kim, S. N., Lee, H. E., Yoon, S. J., & Seomun, G. (2014). Development of a standardized job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs in Korean community health centers. Asian nursing research8(1), 57-66.

Lipińska-Grobelny, A., & Wasiak, K. (2010). Job satisfaction and gender identity of women managers and non-managers. International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health23(2), 161-166.

Sostrin, J. (2013). Beyond the job description: How managers and employees can navigate the true demands of the job. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

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