I need a discussion done week 5 for my strategic partnering with the

Even the smartest students need writing assistance at some point during their academic career. Should you lock yourself in a room and spend the entire weekend trying to write a paper? We promise you that the paper that you pay for won’t be resold or submitted elsewhere. It will also be written according to the instructions that you and your professor provide. Our excellent essays stand out among the rest for a reason. Don’t just take our word, check them out by yourself.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

 The Workforce of YOUR FuturePost a link to an article published in the last 12 months in The Wall Street Journal or other reputable source about trends that are impacting hiring and job readiness in your business or industry.

  • What are the most significant changes you have personally seen in hiring requirements in your current or previous organization over the last 5 years? How do these align to the trends identified in the article you posted?
  • Does your HR leadership team talk with business unit leaders about the trends that will impact workforce needs over the next 5 years? Why or why not?
  • What are the biggest threats (either from competitors or market conditions) in the areas of recruitment and talent development your organization faces?
  • What will your workforce look like in 10 years if you get it right?

Post your initial response by Wednesday, midnight of your time zone, and reply to at least 2 of your classmates’ initial posts by Sunday, midnight of your time zone.​ 

1st person to respond to is Shara

 

Hello everyone,

Link:  https://www.wsj.com/articles/millions-of-workers-stay-home-to-watch-young-children-as-daycares-struggle-11635087600?page=1

What are the most significant changes you have personally seen in hiring requirements in your current or previous organization over the last 5 years?   

The most significant issue in hiring is not having enough people to hire who are interested in teaching in the early education field.  The most significant change would be “hiring for attitude and training for skill.”  The problem before the pandemic was that the economy was substantial, people were working, and childcare centers were packed to capacity. However, there was a shortage of workers, which has a domino effect; it causes more stress on those working as they have to cover longer days, and then the burnout increases, which increases turnover.  “ Nearly 110,000 childcare workers left the labor force between February 2020 and September” (Dill, WSJ) was the number that they think left the industry this last year; I would say it is a lot more, and those numbers will be reviewed in the next 6 months.  So, pre-pandemic, there was already an issue starting to escalate, and post-pandemic, it is more evident and disastrous.

How do these align with the trends identified in the article you posted?

The article I posted truly speaks to the loss of 1 per every 10 workers who did not return to a childcare job.  Frankly, being a child care teacher is a hard job, and teachers deserve more money.  The impact of that increase dwindles to the families who pay tuition.  Childcare has a meager profit margin, and the bulk gets passed to families to pay for the care.

Does your HR leadership team talk with business unit leaders about the trends that will impact workforce needs over the next 5 years? Why or why not?

Our HR leadership is currently identifying the new trends and creating a new strategy to get employees interested in this industry again.

What are the biggest threats (either from competitors or market conditions) in the areas of recruitment and talent development your organization faces?

The biggest threat we face is the loss of revenue due to not having enough staff to enroll more families.  We have more people than ever, leaving the field of teaching together.  Every employee in this industry wants something different.  Some want more money; many want better and cheaper benefits.  Some employees wish to have free child care for their children to teach and make a decent wage, while others are so dedicated that they embrace everything and appreciate all support.  There is not a one-size-fits-all.

What will your workforce look like in 10 years if you get it right?

If we get it right, we will have more employees who make an equitable and fair wage above the market.  We will have increased enrollment and satisfaction from families that creates a consistent bottom line for each location.  We will have accredited sites and continue our mission to be the highest quality company in the childcare industry.  We will continue our ranking on Fortunes 100 Best Companies to Work for and pioneer many new early education initiatives.  If we get it right, the sky is the limit on what can be done for the children in our care and the employees who work so hard to care for them and their families every day.

Regards,

Shara

References:

  1.  Gill. WSJ. https://www.wsj.com/articles/millions-of-workers-stay-home-to-watch-young-children-as-daycares-struggle-11635087600?page=1

 

2nd person to respond to is Rosa

 

Hello Professors Wallace and Cairns, and Classmates: 

Below are my answers to the week five discussion question:

  • What are the most significant changes you have personally seen in hiring requirements in your current or previous organization over the last five years? How do these align with the trends identified in the article you posted?

The article in the Wall Street Journal that I found talks about work from home and what that means to salary expectations. This trend already existed before the pandemic but increased dramatically for many companies that had to adapt to remote work. It included the aspect of hiring and attracting talent. I believe remote work is the trend that has affected companies tremendously and that it will continue to do so in the post-pandemic world. As the author says, remote work does not mean the employee needs to get a pay cut. However, homework needs to be done analyzing the equivalent salary of a person working in headquarters or an office space, how much the will employee save in parking, eating out, and calculate the starting salary with those numbers in mind. (1)

  • Does your HR leadership team talk with business unit leaders about the trends that will impact workforce needs over the next five years? Why or why not?

Yes, they are, and they should. They need to be talking because hiring and retaining people in a shifting work environment (100% remote, hybrid, Office) has many challenges for Human Resources. They need to ensure equality in hiring, promoting employees who will be working in different structures. They also need to ensure the management team is spending time with each employee that is not in the Office via weekly meetings, lunch opportunities, discussing work and nonwork subjects, and staying connected to the people they lead in the organization. (2)

  • What are the biggest threats (either from competitors or market conditions) in the recruitment and talent development areas your organization faces?

Currently, there is a crisis of open jobs, resignations, and labor shortages. Companies need to be flexible in their options to their workers, add benefits to office workers such as high-end snacks, provide spaces for collaboration (small, medium, large), and make attractive offers and incentives to attract and retain the best talent. (3) 

  • What will your workforce look like in 10 years if you get it right?

A happy workforce that has adapted to a post-pandemic world has options to work for the company (at the Office, 100% remote, partially remote, hybrid). It looks like a workforce with benefits that impact their wellbeing (wellness programs, parental leave, childcare support, attractive office benefit) and that has a clear path to success in the company. A workforce that knows their manager and their company cares about them and is able and willing to adapt to circumstances like the pandemic and more. 

The three articles below provide great information on the topic of remote work, the technologies that enable it, and how companies can be successful at bringing people back to the Office either full time or part time. They give great insight into what is happening today and the challenges that both companies and workers face as we go back to a pre-pandemic world. 

Best Regards, 

Rosy

References:

1. Kathryn Dill. Oct 31, 2021. Does Working from Home Have to Mean a Lower Salary?. The Wall Street Journal. https://www.wsj.com/articles/does-working-from-home-have-to-mean-a-lower-salary-11635699600?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1

2. Daniel Akst. Oct 29, 2021. Zoom, Slack, Google Hangouts and More: The Hidden Risks of Remote Work.  The Wall Street Journal. https://www.wsj.com/articles/zoom-slack-remote-work-risks-11635427086?mod=Searchresults_pos20&page=2

3. Alexandra Samuel. Oct 30, 2021. How Bosses can Lure Remote Workers Back to the Office. The Wall Street Journal. https://www.wsj.com/articles/boss-get-remote-workers-back-office-11635531138?mod=Searchresults_pos13&page=1

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 1 of 7

JWI 522
Strategic Partnering with the C-Suite

Week Five Lecture Notes

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 2 of 7

BUILDING TOMORROW’S WORKFORCE

What it Means

Strategic HR leadership requires deep insight into trends that will impact the business over the long
term. Companies have to develop workforces that are able to keep up with changes in the market, and that
can grow and adapt. Senior HR leaders must focus on the landscape 5 or 10 years down the road and be
preparing for this now. This not only requires a well-developed plan, but it must include structures and
processes that support agility if things don’t go as planned.

Why it Matters

• Market conditions are constantly changing, and yesterday’s workforce will not allow you to beat
tomorrow’s competitors.

• Building a strong workforce requires deep knowledge of the labor market and a plan that enables
your organization to pay appropriately to get the talent you need.

• Without the right people on board, the strategic plan will not succeed.

“Build the company now that you
want to be then.”

Patty McCord

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 3 of 7

THE IMPORTANCE OF A LONG-TERM GROWTH PLAN

As the saying goes, “the future ain’t what it used to be.” And nowhere are those sage words truer than in
attracting, retaining, and developing the talent your organization needs to ensure its long-term success. To
prepare for that future, McCord advises, “You’ve got to hire now the team you wish to have in the future.”
(Powerful, P. 72) That makes sense, of course, but it’s easier said than done.

The talent profiles of the workers who have gotten the organization to where it is today are unlikely to be the
same as those needed to sustain that competitive advantage in the future. For most businesses, new
technologies will make old ways of doing things obsolete. Those changes may be tied to the development
and delivery of your products, or to how your customers purchase and use your products. Either way, most
organizations will find themselves facing a series of inflection points where new skills and capabilities
become critical to winning. If HR leaders and business leaders are not out ahead of that, they’ll find their
competitors have beaten them to the talent market, and all the best and brightest are working for the other
guys.

While it may sound trite to haul out old clichés like “The only constant is change,” the reality is that these
sayings have proven themselves to be true. The challenge, of course, is not in recognizing that things
change, but in peering into the crystal ball and correctly assessing:

• In what ways and how quickly will things change?
• What threats and opportunities will these changes present to the business?
• How do we manage our staffing and workforce development to prepare for the changes and

strengthen our competitive advantage?

As McCord advises:

“One of the most important questions business leaders must regularly ask is, ‘Are we limited by the
team we have not being the team we should have?’”

“Build the ideal team by starting with the vision down the road. Identify the problem you want to
solve, the time frame in which you want to solve it, the kinds of people who will be successful at that,
and what they need to know how to do, then ask yourself, what do we need to do to be ready and
able, and whom do we need to bring in?”

Powerful, P. 78

STRATEGIC PLANNING AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

In Week 2, we discussed the importance of building a strong alignment between HR and the strategic
initiatives of the organization. We’re going to revisit that again this week. It is critical that the CHRO
evaluates business strategy and market conditions against goals and current capabilities, and then develops
a staffing and talent management plan to meet the objectives.

There are a number of frameworks used in developing strategic plans for businesses. These tools are
helpful for HR leaders as well in conducting a “SWOT” analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities, and Threats that impact your organization and your workforce. A detailed examination of
these is beyond the scope of this course, but you are encouraged to do additional research to familiarize
yourself with the most common tools used by strategists. Two of the most useful of these are outlined
below.

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 4 of 7

PESTEL Analysis is focused on identifying macro-environmental factors that can impact your business, i.e.,
the big-picture things going on that are external to your marketing environment. In exploring these factors,
you need to assess what the leading indicators (or triggers) are, how likely these will actually occur, and
whether the impact on the business would be positive or negative. The components of PESTEL are:

• Political – analysis of the impact from government in areas of taxation, elections, changes in
leadership, policies, etc.

• Economic – analysis of general macro conditions, including whether we are in a recession or
economic expansion, and potential changes in interest rates, currency fluctuations, tariffs, etc.

• Social – trends in demographics (such as the average age of the population and growth/decline of
the available workforce), as well as general sentiments around important issues such as health,
education, and immigration. These factors can have a significant impact on the makeup of the
potential workforce you can recruit from.

• Technological – what are the changes in the technology that impact product function and
development? How will these changes guide the type of skills you will need to develop in your
workforce in order to keep up?

• Environmental – forces that impact environmental regulations as well as sentiments on issues like
climate change and pollution which can impact the business.

• Legal – factors in industry regulations, employment law, or compliance that could require changes to
how things get done or get reported.

Another popular tool in strategy development is Michael Porter’s Five Forces, which explores the
competitive forces within the market or industry. Strategists using Porter’s Five Forces are asking questions
about power. Who has it, and how can it be exploited and/or defended against? The objective is to develop a
strategy that will improve your position and make you the biggest, the best, or the most distinctive in your
market. These forces are:

• Force 1: Rivals
These are the companies directly competing with you for the hearts and minds of your target
customers. A few well-chosen questions can help identify challenges and opportunities: how large
are your competitors? Are there many of them or few? How mature are they in the space? In what
ways are you better or different from them? Rivals are central to your industry analysis. They
compete with you, both for raw materials from suppliers (Force 2) and for customers (Force 3). At the
same time, you and your rivals may share a common enemy, in the form of a substitute product
(Force 4) or a new market entrant (Force 5).

• Force 2: Suppliers
You’ll want to look at the supply chain in your industry, first by analyzing suppliers. Are the suppliers
large and too few in number? Or do many small players predominate? Which critical types of goods
are most scarce?

• Force 3: Customers
Then, you need to look to the other end of the supply chain, toward your customers. Are they
fragmented into multiple types? Or is there a dominant buying group? What are the switching costs
they would incur to move to, or away from, your products?

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 5 of 7

• Force 4: Substitutes
Unlike direct rivals, these represent indirect competition for your product or service. What other
goods and services are close substitutes for yours? To whom might suppliers sell, or from whom
might customers buy, instead of you? For example, watching movies at home and going to live plays
are both substitutes for seeing movies at a public theater. Competitors to theaters would want to
understand the price difference or delivery mechanism that might prompt customers to choose one
form of entertainment over another.

• Force 5: New Entrants
You need to be on the lookout for new direct competitors. Which players, or types of companies,
might enter your market and compete against you? Do they represent an opportunity as well as a
threat? Say you were a delicatessen selling sandwiches and salads in 1988. At the time, large
supermarkets were beginning to experiment with prepared foods. They might have been seen as a
new entrant threatening to steal many of your customers. Conversely, they might have represented
customers for your prepared foods, thereby expanding your business.

While it’s not the responsibility of the HR department to be the sole driver of the strategy of the business, you
are encouraged to review these tools and integrate them into your long-term workforce planning. HR leaders
seeking a seat at the table as a member of the C-Suite recognize that they have a critical role to play as
partners in developing and executing a long-term strategic plan. This plan must include a reality check of
what it will cost to hire and retain the people you need. The more detailed and specific your analyses are, the
better you will be able to create accurate models for hiring and development costs. Patty McCord warns us,
however, that:

“Compensation departments end up spending gobs of time comparing descriptions and making the
best calculations they can to adjust for all factors. But of course, that process still only gives you a
baseline understanding of the true market landscape.”

“Market demand is still not adequate as a guide to compensation you should offer, because it is of
the current moment, while hiring should be about the future.”

Powerful, P.112

If we take the principle of “people before strategy” seriously, then HR’s role as a driver of competitive
advantage has to include a long-term view down the road to assess and plan for the needs of the future.
We cannot allow ourselves to let others own the entire strategic planning process without our input. If we do,
our role in workforce development will be relegated to waiting for new-hire requisitions to come in, and then
managing the search process to fill today’s empty roles.

SUCCESSION PLANNING

With all of this focus on change, it would be easy to think that building the workforce of the future is only about
hiring new talent. The people you need, however, may already be part of the team. Succession planning may
well be one of the most underappreciated practices in HR and in leadership and management in general. It
gets talked about a lot, but it doesn’t always get handled well.

It’s one of those topics that far too many organizations don’t worry about until it’s too late – the business is
running at full steam, you have strong teams in place with strong leaders at the helm, and all is well. But
Conaty and Charan understand that matters can change quickly. The late-night phone call, the surprise email,

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 6 of 7

the unexpected meeting when the employee walks into the boss’s office and says, “Hey, do you have a few
minutes? I need to talk to you about something important,” all remind us:

… talent is the key to the future. Strategies come and go, market share and profits wax and wane,
but an organization that can build a self-renewing team of first-rate leaders is prepared to handle
anything that tomorrow brings.

The Talent Masters, P. 254

As you’ve seen in our readings, GE under Jack’s leadership was built on having a rigorous evaluation
system. This system not only allowed managers to provide candid feedback to everyone on their teams
about what they were doing well and where they needed to improve, it also did something else. It created a
system in which promotion potential was front and center. Throughout the organization, for every senior
management role, there was a list of potential successors who were being observed, tested, and coached.
The goal was that, if a senior leader suddenly had to be replaced, the new leader could be in place within 48
hours and the business wouldn’t miss a beat.

Many companies don’t feel a sense of urgency about their leadership talent until their businesses fall
apart or they need to engineer a strategic shift … talent masters understand that there’s a difference
between trying to patch things up and rebuilding the organization’s talent for the long term.

The Talent Masters, P. 197

There are two considerations required for successful succession planning:

1. First, you have to understand the nature of the business and culture. Is it growing? Do people stick
around and move through the ranks? Do we have (or need) talent development programs that groom
the next generation of leaders?

2. How important is continuity in our organization? Does it matter if the next wave of leadership comes
from within or not? This is actually a pretty important question. The answer depends a lot on the
makeup of the workforce, the rate of turnover, and whether the CEO sees it as a priority.

Admittedly, building a culture where succession planning is part of the fabric of performance evaluation and
people development may be a long journey. It requires support from the CEO, and it requires a system that
has reinforcements. Because let’s be honest, many managers will view building a strong
future for the business as something different from growing the next generation of leaders. It’s the job of HR
to make sure this disconnect doesn’t happen.

© Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University Confidential and Proprietary information and may not
be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University.

JWI 522 (1192) Page 7 of 7

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF THIS WEEK’S CLASS

As you read the materials and participate in class activities, stay focused on the key learning outcomes for
the week:

• Understand the importance of having a long-term growth plan

How far ahead are you and your team looking when it comes to talent acquisition, development, and
retention? Are you planning for tomorrow’s workforce, or taking orders to fill today’s vacancies?
Leadership, especially C-suite leadership, must play the long game. What can you do to connect the
5-year strategy of the organization to an assessment of the talent you now have and what you’ll
need? Which positions will be more in demand, and what new talents will be needed that aren’t well-
defined now? Which positions will become redundant, and how can you plan for these reductions to
have the least disruption to the company and to impacted staff?

• Apply strategic planning tools to workforce development

Are you keeping up with what’s going on with your competitors and the broader economic
environment? Build your knowledge about the tools and frameworks used by economists and
strategists, and leverage these to build staffing models to create your workforce of the future.
Subscribe to industry journals and economic and financial publications like the Economist and
the Wall Street Journal.

• Evaluate succession planning needs against talent development practices

How much time do you and your business leaders spend evaluating and developing the potential of
current team members? Having a deep bench can help your organization improve agility and
prepare for unexpected events. Think about what can be done now to develop high-potential
employees in ways that allow you to test them with new challenges and stretch assignments, while
providing an appropriate safety net of coaching and support.

Writerbay.net

Do you need help with this or a different assignment? In a world where academic success does not come without efforts, we do our best to provide the most proficient and capable essay writing service. After all, impressing professors shouldn’t be hard, we make that possible. If you decide to make your order on our website, you will get 15 % off your first order. You only need to indicate the discount code GET15.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper